COMMON LAW V. STATUTORY JURISDICTION WHICH ARE YOU IN? Part 6

Common law

COMMON LAW — the Law of the Land V. STATUTORY JURISDICTION ATTORNEY written STATUTES and CODES, RULES, REGULATIONS, JUDGES’ OPINIONS, Presumptions,and PUBLIC POLICY under the COLOR OF LAW are NOT Law according to the UNITED STATES SUPREME COURT.

U.C. Code of commercial contracts states:

“The Code is complementary to the Common Law, which remains in force, except where displaced by the code.” UCC 1-103.6.
The UCC provides the mechanism for making the choice between common law jurisdiction and statutory jurisdiction. It also states that the failure to make the choice results in the loss of your common law rights.
“When a waivable right or claim is involved, the failure to make a reservation thereof, causes a loss of the right, and bars its assertion at a later date.” UCC 1-207.9.
“The Sufficiency of the Reservation — Any expression indicating an intention to reserve rights, is sufficient, such as “without prejudice.” UCC 1-207.4.
The specific method for reserving your common law rights — for choosing to operate under common law jurisdiction — is to write above or below your signature “Without Prejudice UCC 1-308 (Old UCC 1-207.4).” You could use this phrase on your STATE OF driver’s license, on bank signature cards, the IMF’s Social Security Card, and on all contracts.

Your rights to own property and to engage in voluntary exchange by NON-REGISTRATION of your business or property is basic common law rights.
Common-Law is the law of the land, the law of the Constitution. Statutory law is legislated law as codes, statutes, rules, regulations, opinions, Presumptions, Assumptions, and public policy under the Color of Law and written by BAR and BANK ATTORNEYS for their own gain. For their own gain includes the BANK and GOVERNMENT corporations that they work for. Your rights to own property and to engage in voluntary exchange by NON-REGISTRATION of your business or property are basic common law rights. Think about it..

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